Professional Development: Failure is Good

FAILURE IS GOOD Failure is not something we naturally enjoy, nor is it often viewed in a positive light.  In addition to the frustration that comes from having attempted and then failed at a something, failure can cause us to question our own self-worth and abilities, leading us onto a slippery slope of negative reinforcement. But perhaps we simply have the wrong mindset when it comes to failure. In their book Go for No, authors Richard Fenton and Andrea Waltz argue that failure, or ‘no’, is actually a critical step on the road to success, or ‘yes’.  Rather than expect ‘yes’ and success upfront in our endeavors, we need to accept the fact that success generally comes after having tried and/or practiced something many times, failing as we go along.  Just as an aspiring athlete or musician shouldn’t expect to become famous overnight, individuals in the business world should become comfortable with the fact that they will hear ‘no’ from their clients far more times than they hear ‘yes’.  They must learn to remain persistent, understanding that each ‘no’ brings them closer to a ‘yes’. While Go For No looks at failure as a stepping stone to success mainly from a business-perspective, the same logic holds true in all areas of life.  Ask yourself: how do babies learn to walk?  They try to stand up, wobble from imbalance, and then they fall down.  They fail.  And then they get up, wobble again, and fall down again.  They fail again.  They fail over and over, but each time they try they slowly improve their skill until finally they manage to...

Member Giveaway: Leadercast Viewing Tickets

  Leadercast 2017 is a little over a month away, and PEAK is excited to announce that we will be giving tickets to our members again this year!  These tickets retail at $99 each, and this year’s theme is Powered by Purpose.  There are a limited number of tickets available that will be given to members on a first-come, first-served basis. Event Info: Date:  Friday, May 5 Time:  9:00 AM Location:  Eastman’s Toy F. Reid Employee Center (400 S Wilcox Drive) To claim your ticket: It’s simple!  Just shoot us an email at info(at)ypkingsport(dot)com   See you...

Professional Development: Catalyst

CATALYST     There is a story of a young boy who one day found a large caterpillar while playing in the forest.  He really liked the caterpillar, and so he brought it home to take care of it, placing it in a jar where he kept it fed.   Then one day he watched as the caterpillar began to wrap itself into a cocoon, and the boy became excited, knowing that in a short time the caterpillar would transform into a beautiful butterfly. The boy checked the cocoon daily, and soon saw that it was starting to crack as the butterfly was beginning to break free.  The boy however noticed that rather than happening quickly, the butterfly was tearing out of its cocoon very slowly, appearing to be struggling as it did.  Concerned and wanting to help it, the boy fetched a knife and very carefully cut open the rest of the cocoon to help the butterfly escape. The boy was eager, expecting to see the beautiful butterfly open its wings and begin to fly.  But something was wrong.  Instead of having large, powerful wings capable of flight, the wings were small and feeble, unable to lift the butterfly into the air despite its efforts to try.  The boy also noticed that its body appeared deformed, seeming to still look more like a caterpillar than a butterfly. Now greatly concerned for the creature, the boy went to find his father and brought him back to look at the butterfly.  When the father realized that his son had cut open the cocoon, he sighed and looked down at his son...

Professional Development: The Power of Association

How many people do you know?  The answer is probably many.  But how many of those would you consider yourself to have a close and meaningful relationship with?  Statistically that answer is likely fewer than five, enough to count on one hand.  Now for the important question: what is the impact of those associations on your life? You’ve likely heard the phrase “Birds of a feather flock together.”  This concept mirrors what professional development experts refer to as “The Power of Association.”  The idea is that not only will individuals gravitate towards individuals who share similar interests and attitudes, but also that those interests and attitudes will be amplified when around others of the same traits.  Over time this can result in significant changes in our lives, and we should therefore be aware of this phenomenon. Let’s use golf as an example.  Imagine that you are playing with a group, and that you are the weakest player in the group.  This Is actually a very good thing.  The reason is that due to the Power of Association, your skill level will improve while playing with this stronger group.  You will be forced to focus more and perform harder in order to compete, and the others in the group will also be inclined to help you by providing tips and technique ideas.  As long as you are open to the environment you are in, their skills and expertise will naturally transfer to you, making you a better player in the process.  As leadership expert Darren Hardy states, “To keep growing, you have to keep associating with those who are greater...

PEAK Newsletter – 3/6/17

A quick update. Happy Monday!  Here’s a quick update on what’s going on in PEAK + photos and video from The PEAK Event this weekend.  Thanks to everyone who attended. Have a great week!  We can’t wait to see everyone at Thursday’s PEAK Around Town! – The...

Professional Development: Bridging Personalities

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.  “16PF”.  Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis.  These are just three of the dozens of different personality tests available today, each designed to explain the ins-and-outs of your personality.  While the fact that we give personality types so much attention highlights our belief in their importance, have you ever paused to consider just how great a role your personality has in your daily interactions?  Have you ever wondered why you are able to connect easily with one person while another continually “pushes your buttons”?  While there are countless variables that determine how two individuals will interact, understanding your personality and that of others can make a huge impact in your ability to connect. In her book Wired That Way*, Dr. Marita Littauer defines four main personality types: sanguine, melancholy, choleric, and phlegmatic.  While ultimately these are merely generalizations and in no way completely define how a person’s temperament, Dr. Littauer argues that an awareness of the positive and negative attributes of these personality types can improve our ability to interact with those who have attributes that are different from our own. Positive Attributes: Sanguine: outgoing, energetic, curious, friendly, vocal Melancholy: sensitive, concerned, organized, analytical, thoughtful Choleric: confident, goal-oriented, “natural leader”, fast to act Phlegmatic: good listener, steady, easy going, relaxed Negative Attributes: Sanguine: not time sensitive, too talkative, tends to be self-focused Melancholy: easily moody or depressed, too analytical, suspicious, hard to please Choleric: unsympathetic, tactless, places blame onto others, acts without thinking Phlegmatic: indecisive, too quiet about feelings, indifferent, uninterested Again, remember that these are merely generalizations, and that it is possible for an individual to have...

Professional Development: Get a Vision

“A computer on every desk.” – Bill Gates on Microsoft “A man on the moon within the decade.” – John F. Kennedy on NASA “We will deliver the best health care anywhere.” – Wellmont Health System “The preferred quick-service restaurant.” – Pal’s Sudden Service These sentences are examples of Vision Statements, declarations that clearly state the ultimate goal or desired achievement for those organization.  Vision Statements exist in every successful business, rather it be a Fortune 500 organization or a small family-owned industry.  They serve as rallying point around which all employees of an organization can focus their energy towards, providing purpose for the daily efforts. If successful organizations believe in the importance of having a Vision Statement that describes their most desired goal, does it not stand to reason that you as an individual should also have a personal vision for what you desire to achieve in life?  The short and long answer is yes, you should. World-renowned leadership expert John Maxwell speaks often on the subject of vision, especially as it relates to “living intentionally.”  Having a vision isn’t just about having another goal that you are aiming for, although goals can be a part of a vision.  Rather, a vision creates a sense of purpose and identity, a “why” that explains the reasons that you do what you do.  Visions tend to stem from deep passions inside you, causing you to dream big and driving you to strive for more than any list of goals ever will.  And having a vision will keep you from simply “coasting” through life, especially when your vision will impact and...

Professional Development: Do you have SMART goals?

Now that it’s February, let’s ask ourselves an honest question: How is your News Years’ Resolution coming along?  Do you even remember what it was?  If you don’t, you’re not alone.  Several studies have shown that over half of all New Years’ Resolutions are dropped by the end of January!  Even more shockingly is that on average only 8% of all New Years’ Resolutions are achieved! These statistics raise an important question: how can you set goals or resolutions that you will be more likely to achieve?  Thankfully, there are answers. Professional development expert Terri Savelle Foy recommends making your goals “SMART”: Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Timely Let’s use an example goal to see what this looks like. One common goal or resolution that you hear people make is “I’m going to lose weight.”  Using Terri’s checklist however, you can see that this goal raises many questions.  How much weight are you going to lose?  How will you measure your progress?  Are you planning on losing an attainable and realistic amount of weight?  How?  And how long are you going to give yourself to do this? So how could you better define this goal?  Using Terri’s checklist as a guide, we could elaborate on the goal to make it: “I will lose twenty pounds over a period of five months by spending at least three days each week at the gym.”   This goal makes it clear how much weight you are aiming to lose, and by establishing a timeline it also provides marker points to monitor your progress (four pounds per month for five months).  It also specifies how...